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Eating Seasonally in Autumn

Written by: Brianna Hanson

Autumn weather is finally upon us. With this recent change in season, it’s worth considering if there should be a change in our nutrition. In recent years, we have gotten accustomed to full access to all foods any time of the year. However, there are certain benefits to eating seasonal foods, some of which we will cover in this blog. Not to mention that foods abundant in autumn are comforting, warming and nourishing. 

Eating foods that grow best in autumn ensures a higher nutrient quantity. This is because produce that is out of season is picked prematurely, not allowing the produce to fully ripen. Studies have shown that produce allowed to fully ripen on the plant is higher in nutrients compared to those prematurely picked. Another benefit to eating seasonally is saving money. Produce in season is found in abundance and, therefore, it is often cheaper. 

Listed below are just a few of the foods that are currently in season this Autumn and recipes to go along with them! 

  • Cinnamon 

Cinnamon ranks #1 among the top spices of today. In fact, cinnamon was once used for its medicinal purposes in traditional medicine. Cinnamon is a good source of fiber, calcium, iron and vitamin K. These nutrients cover a wide variety of benefits such as better blood sugar control, enhanced heart health and reduced inflammation. 

Here is a recipe for cinnamon oatmeal pancakes:

Cinnamon Swirl Pancakes
  • Turmeric 

Turmeric belongs to the ginger family. Turmeric is a good source of iron, potassium and magnesium. These nutrients assist in stabilizing blood pressure, heart rate, and red blood cell production. 

Here is a recipe for turmeric-tahini dressing:

  • Apples

Apples are amount the top 3 fruits produced in the world today. Apples are a great source of fiber, vitamin C and disease fighting agents called phytochemicals. It is important to note that apples rank among the highest in pesticide residue. It is recommended to wash all produce under running water before consuming. 

Here is a recipe for a wonderful apple crisp:

  • Cranberries

Cranberries are a good source of carbs and fiber. They are also rich in vitamins and minerals such as vitamin C. Cranberries are hardly ever eaten raw due to their sharp and sour taste. They are most often consumed in sauces, dried, or as juice. 

Here is a recipe for cranberry-orange muffins

Iced cranberry orange muffins
  • Sweet potato

Sweet potatoes of full of vitamin C, vitamin A, and potassium. The nutrients in sweet potatoes are known for cancer prevention, eye health, cardiovascular health, and aid in diabetes management. 

Here is the recipe for a zesty sweet potato bowl

  • Pumpkin

Pumpkin is a good source of vitamin A and C. These nutrients are great for your immune system, protect your cells from damage, and sustain eye health. Just one cup of pumpkin contains 87% of the recommended daily vitamin A intake. 

Here is a recipe for pumpkin bread: 

Let us know what new things you have tried this fall!

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